Archive for March, 2011

RADIATION RISKS TO HEALTH: A Joint Statement from the American Association


 

 

American Thyroid Association

RADIATION RISKS TO HEALTH:
A Joint Statement from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Thyroid Association, The Endocrine Society and the Society of Nuclear Medicine

March 18, 2011

The recent nuclear reactor accident in Japan due to the earthquake and tsunami has raised fears of radiation exposure to populations in North America from the potential plume of radioactivity crossing the Pacific Ocean. The principal radiation source of concern is radioactive iodine including iodine-131, a radioactive isotope that presents a special risk to health because iodine is concentrated in the thyroid gland and exposure of the thyroid to high levels of radioactive iodine may lead to development of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer years later. During the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, people in the surrounding region were exposed to radioactive iodine principally from intake of food and milk from contaminated farmlands. As demonstrated by the Chernobyl experience, pregnant women, fetuses, infants and children are at the highest risk for developing thyroid cancer whereas adults over age 20 are at negligible risk.

 

Radioiodine uptake by the thyroid can be blocked by taking potassium iodide (KI) pills or solution, most importantly in these sensitive populations. However, KI should not be taken in the absence of a clear risk of exposure to a potentially dangerous level of radioactive iodine because potassium iodide can cause allergic reactions, skin rashes, salivary gland inflammation, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism in a small percentage of people. Since radioactive iodine decays rapidly, current estimates indicate there will not be a hazardous level of radiation reaching the United States from this accident. When an exposure does warrant KI to be taken, it should be taken as directed by physicians or public health authorities until the risk for significant exposure to radioactive iodine dissipates, but probably for no more than 1-2 weeks. With radiation accidents, the greatest risk is to populations close to the radiation source.  While some radiation may be detected in the United States and its territories in the Pacific as a result of this accident, current estimates indicate that radiation amounts will be little above baseline atmospheric levels and will not be harmful to the thyroid gland or general health.

 

We discourage individuals needlessly purchasing or hoarding of KI in the United States. Moreover, since there is not a radiation emergency in the United States or its territories, we do not support the ingestion of KI prophylaxis at this time. Our professional societies will continue to monitor potential risks to health from this accident and will issue amended advisories as warranted.

 

RADIATION RISKS TO HEALTH: A Joint Statement from the American Association


American Thyroid Association
Dedicated to Scientific Inquiry, Clinical Excellence, Public Service, Education, and Collaboration

American Thyroid Association

RADIATION RISKS TO HEALTH:
A Joint Statement from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Thyroid Association, The Endocrine Society and the Society of Nuclear Medicine
March 18, 2011

The recent nuclear reactor accident in Japan due to the earthquake and tsunami has raised fears of radiation exposure to populations in North America from the potential plume of radioactivity crossing the Pacific Ocean. The principal radiation source of concern is radioactive iodine including iodine-131, a radioactive isotope that presents a special risk to health because iodine is concentrated in the thyroid gland and exposure of the thyroid to high levels of radioactive iodine may lead to development of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer years later. During the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, people in the surrounding region were exposed to radioactive iodine principally from intake of food and milk from contaminated farmlands. As demonstrated by the Chernobyl experience, pregnant women, fetuses, infants and children are at the highest risk for developing thyroid cancer whereas adults over age 20 are at negligible risk.
Radioiodine uptake by the thyroid can be blocked by taking potassium iodide (KI) pills or solution, most importantly in these sensitive populations. However, KI should not be taken in the absence of a clear risk of exposure to a potentially dangerous level of radioactive iodine because potassium iodide can cause allergic reactions, skin rashes, salivary gland inflammation, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism in a small percentage of people. Since radioactive iodine decays rapidly, current estimates indicate there will not be a hazardous level of radiation reaching the United States from this accident. When an exposure does warrant KI to be taken, it should be taken as directed by physicians or public health authorities until the risk for significant exposure to radioactive iodine dissipates, but probably for no more than 1-2 weeks. With radiation accidents, the greatest risk is to populations close to the radiation source.  While some radiation may be detected in the United States and its territories in the Pacific as a result of this accident, current estimates indicate that radiation amounts will be little above baseline atmospheric levels and will not be harmful to the thyroid gland or general health.
We discourage individuals needlessly purchasing or hoarding of KI in the United States. Moreover, since there is not a radiation emergency in the United States or its territories, we do not support the ingestion of KI prophylaxis at this time. Our professional societies will continue to monitor potential risks to health from this accident and will issue amended advisories as warranted.


SUSCEPTIBILITY and HOMEOPATHY


SUSCEPTIBILITY and HOMEOPATHY


What dictionary says:-

1. State or character of being susceptible: susceptibility to disease.

2. Capacity for receiving mental or moral impressions; tendency to be emotionally affected.

3. Susceptibilities, capacities for emotion; feelings: His susceptibilities are easily wounded.

 

Susceptibility can be defined as the state of susceptible enough to acquire or achieve something.Susceptibility is the tendency of the body to receive impressions. The impressions can be ofhealth, disease and cure. Susceptibility is not always associated with development of diseases. Itis the inherent “sensitivity” with which patient is exposed to various forces, forces of disease andhealth. Susceptibility of an individual doesn’t only depend upon the physical constitution, but isan inherent mechanism which is altered by mental, emotional, psychological, biochemical andphysical levels.
Susceptibility plays vital role in maintenance of various bodily functions, as well as alterationof stated to diseased. Following are some of the factors which are root to susceptibility of anindividual:-
1. Physical constitution

2. Diathesis

3. Mental make up

4. Biochemical reactions of body

5. Emotional quotient

6. Psychological outlook

For a very long time susceptibility was thought to be only an inner phenomenon, whichpredispose us to various diseases. It used to be considered as a separate entity which isresponsible for evil phenomenon and morbid states. When Homoeopathy came in existence andHahnemann elaborated the infalliable laws and basic philosophy of Homoeopathy, it becameclearer day by day that susceptibility is not a local melody or phenomenon. It is a complex arrayof vital force, mind and body. If one is susceptible to a certain group of diseases or morbidstates, he will develop such states and suffer. This power to “affect”, has many roots and manythings add their importance while dealing with such states, for e.g. if an individual is susceptibleto develop diabetes mellitus, he will develop it earlier if exposed to faulty life style such as dietand lack of exercise, overweight or obesity, more of stress, etc. All these factors contribute andaggravate the state susceptible or prone to diabetes mellitus.

We read susceptibility in context of disease, considering that a healthy individual is less or notsusceptible to diseases under normal circumstances. When a fundamental cause, causation ormaintaining factor comes into play, the susceptibility towards disease is increased.

 

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GENE THERAPY – An Overview of the Future Panacea_by Dr Mansi Arya


GENE THERAPY – An Overview of the Future Panacea

Contributed by:- Dr. Mansi Arya, R & D Officer – SBL Pvt. Ltd., Consultant – SBL Clinic
Credential info: dr.mansiarya333@gmail.com, mansi.arya@sblglobal.in, Category: Genetics

Genes, which are carried on chromosomes, are the basic physical and functional units of heredity. Genes are specific sequences of bases that encode instructions on how to make proteins. Although genes get a lot of attention, it’s the proteins that perform most life functions and even make up the majority of cellular structures. When genes are altered so that the encoded proteins are unable to carry out their normal functions, genetic disorders can result.
Altered Genes
Each of us carries about half a dozen defective genes. We remain blissfully unaware of this fact unless we, or one of our close relatives, are amongst the many millions who suffer from a genetic disease. About one in ten people has, or will develop at some later stage, an inherited genetic disorder, and approximately 2,800 specific conditions are known to be caused by defects (mutations) in just one of the patient’s genes. Some single gene disorders are quite common – cystic fibrosis is found in one out of every 2,500 babies born in the Western World – and in total, diseases that can be traced to single gene defects account for about 5% of all admissions to children’s hospitals.

Diseases of Genetic Origin

Most of us do not suffer any harmful effects from our defective genes because we carry two copies of nearly all genes, one derived from our mother and the other from our father. The only exceptions to this rule are the genes found on the male sex chromosomes . In the majority of cases, one normal gene is sufficient to avoid all the symptoms of disease.
If the potentially harmful gene is recessive, then its normal counterpart will carry out all the tasks assigned to both. Only if we inherit from our parents two copies of the same recessive gene will a disease develop. On the other hand, if the gene is dominant, it alone can produce the disease, even if its counterpart is normal. Clearly only the children of a parent with the disease can be affected, and then on average only half the children will be affected. Huntington’s chorea, a severe disease of the nervous system, which becomes apparent only in adulthood, is an example of a dominant genetic disease. Finally, there are the X chromosome-linked genetic diseases. As males have only one copy of the genes from this chromosome, there are no others available to fulfill the defective gene’s function. Examples of such diseases are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and, perhaps most well known of all, hemophilia.
What is Gene Therapy ?
Gene therapy is a technique for correcting defective genes responsible for disease development. Researchers may use one of several approaches for correcting faulty genes:

  • A normal gene may be inserted into a nonspecific location within the genome to replace a nonfunctional gene. This approach is most common.
  • An abnormal gene could be swapped for a normal gene through homologous recombination.
  • The abnormal gene could be repaired through selective reverse mutation, which returns the gene to its normal function.
  • The regulation (the degree to which a gene is turned on or off) of a particular gene could be altered.

How does Gene Therapy  work ?
1.In most gene therapy studies, a “normal” gene is inserted into the genome to replace an “abnormal,” disease-causing gene. A carrier molecule called a vector must be used to deliver the therapeutic gene to the patient’s target cells. Currently, the most common vector is a virus that has been genetically altered to carry normal human DNA.
Viruses have evolved a way of encapsulating and delivering their genes to human cells in a pathogenic manner. Scientists have tried to take advantage of this capability and manipulate the virus genome to remove disease-causing genes and insert therapeutic genes.Target cells such as the patient’s liver or lung cells are infected with the viral vector. The vector then unloads its genetic material containing the therapeutic human gene into the target cell. The generation of a functional protein product from the therapeutic gene restores the target cell to a normal state. See a diagram depicting this process. Some of the different types of viruses used as gene therapy vectors are Retroviruses, Adenoviruses , Adeno-associated , Herpes simplex viruses
Image:Gene therapy.jpg
2. Besides virus-mediated gene-delivery systems, there are several nonviral options for gene delivery. The simplest method is the direct introduction of therapeutic DNA into target cells. This approach is limited in its application because it can be used only with certain tissues and requires large amounts of DNA.
3. Another nonviral approach involves the creation of an artificial lipid sphere with an aqueous core. This liposome, which carries the therapeutic DNA, is capable of passing the DNA through the target cell’s membrane.
4. Therapeutic DNA also can get inside target cells by chemically linking the DNA to a molecule that will bind to special cell receptors. Once bound to these receptors, the therapeutic DNA constructs are engulfed by the cell membrane and passed into the interior of the target cell. This delivery system tends to be less effective than other options.
Researchers also are experimenting with introducing a 47th (artificial human) chromosome into target cells. This chromosome would exist autonomously alongside the standard 46 –not affecting their workings or causing any mutations. It would be a large vector capable of carrying substantial amounts of genetic code, and scientists anticipate that, because of its construction and autonomy, the body’s immune systems would not attack it. A problem with this potential method is the difficulty in delivering such a large molecule to the nucleus of a target cell.
What is the current status of Gene Therapy Research ?
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not yet approved any human gene therapy product for sale. Current gene therapy is experimental and has not proven very successful in clinical trials. Little progress has been made since the first gene therapy clinical trial began in 1990. In 1999, gene therapy suffered a major setback with the death of 18-year-old Jesse Gelsinger. Jesse was participating in a gene therapy trial for ornithine transcarboxylase deficiency (OTCD). He died from multiple organ failures 4 days after starting the treatment. His death is believed to have been triggered by a severe immune response to the adenovirus carrier.
Another major blow came in January 2003, when the FDA placed a temporary halt on all gene therapy trials using retroviral vectors in blood stem cells. FDA took this action after it learned that a second child treated in a French gene therapy trial had developed a leukemia-like condition. Both this child and another who had developed a similar condition in August 2002 had been successfully treated by gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (X-SCID), also known as “bubble baby syndrome.”
FDA’s Biological Response Modifiers Advisory Committee (BRMAC) met at the end of February 2003 to discuss possible measures that could allow a number of retroviral gene therapy trials for treatment of life-threatening diseases to proceed with appropriate safeguards. In April of 2003 the FDA eased the ban on gene therapy trials using retroviral vectors in blood stem cells.
What factors have kept  Gene Therapy from becoming an effective treatment  for  Genetic Diseases ?

  • Short-lived nature of gene therapy – Before gene therapy can become a permanent cure for any condition, the therapeutic DNA introduced into target cells must remain functional and the cells containing the therapeutic DNA must be long-lived and stable. Problems with integrating therapeutic DNA into the genome and the rapidly dividing nature of many cells prevent gene therapy from achieving any long-term benefits. Patients will have to undergo multiple rounds of gene therapy.
  • Immune response – Anytime a foreign object is introduced into human tissues, the immune system is designed to attack the invader. The risk of stimulating the immune system in a way that reduces gene therapy effectiveness is always a potential risk. Furthermore, the immune system’s enhanced response to invaders it has seen before makes it difficult for gene therapy to be repeated in patients.
  • Problems with viral vectors – Viruses, while the carrier of choice in most gene therapy studies, present a variety of potential problems to the patient –toxicity, immune and inflammatory responses, and gene control and targeting issues. In addition, there is always the fear that the viral vector, once inside the patient, may recover its ability to cause disease.
  • Multigene disorders – Conditions or disorders that arise from mutations in a single gene are the best candidates for gene therapy. Unfortunately, some the most commonly occurring disorders, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, and diabetes, are caused by the combined effects of variations in many genes. Multigene or multifactorial disorders such as these would be especially difficult to treat effectively using gene therapy.

What are some recent developments in  Gene Therapy  Research?

  • A team of British doctors from Moorfields Eye Hospital and University College in London conduct first human gene therapy trials to treat Leber’s congenital amaurosis, a type of inherited childhood blindness caused by a single abnormal gene. The procedure has already been successful at restoring vision for dogs. This is the first trial to use gene therapy in an operation to treat blindness in humans.
  • A combination of two tumor suppressing genes delivered in lipid-based nanoparticles drastically reduces the number and size of human lung cancer tumors in mice during trials conducted by researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.
  • Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, successfully reengineer immune cells, called lymphocytes, to target and attack cancer cells in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. This is the first time that gene therapy is used to successfully treat cancer in humans.
  • Gene therapy is effectively used to treat two adult patients for a disease affecting nonlymphocytic white blood cells called myeloid cells. Myeloid disorders are common and include a variety of bone marrow failure syndromes, such as acute myeloid leukemia. The study is the first to show that gene therapy can cure diseases of the myeloid system.
  • University of California, Los Angeles, research team gets genes into the brain using liposomes coated in a polymer call polyethylene glycol (PEG). The transfer of genes into the brain is a significant achievement because viral vectors are too big to get across the “blood-brain barrier.” This method has potential for treating Parkinson’s disease.
  • RNA interference or gene silencing may be a new way to treat Huntington’s. Short pieces of double-stranded RNA (short, interfering RNAs or siRNAs) are used by cells to degrade RNA of a particular sequence. If a siRNA is designed to match the RNA copied from a faulty gene, then the abnormal protein product of that gene will not be produced.
  • Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Copernicus Therapeutics are able to create tiny liposomes 25 nanometers across that can carry therapeutic DNA through pores in the nuclear membrane.
  • Sickle cell has been successfully treated in mice.

Ethical Considerations……

  • Preliminary attempts at gene therapy are exorbitantly expensive. Who will have access to these therapies? Who will pay for their use?
  • What is normal and what is a disability or disorder, and who decides?
  • Are disabilities diseases? Do they need to be cured or prevented?
  • Does searching for a cure demean the lives of individuals presently affected by disabilities?
  • Is somatic gene therapy (which is done in the adult cells of persons known to have the disease) more or less ethical than germline gene therapy (which is done in egg and sperm cells and prevents the trait from being passed on to further generations)? In cases of somatic gene therapy, the procedure may have to be repeated in future generations.

The Future
The Human Genome Project in the U.S. will provide about $200 million each year to scientists in multidisciplinary research centers who are attempting to determine the makeup of all human genes. Together with similar programs in Europe, it is hoped that in 15 years time we shall be able to identify and treat all diseases to which humans are susceptible. This will revolutionize modern medicine, and hopefully improve the quality of life of all men, women, and children. Already, the genes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis, and retinoblastoma have been identified, and more such information is emerging all the time.

REFERENCES

  1. Doctors Test Gene Therapy to Treat Blindness at http://www.reuters.com (May 1, 2007).
  2. Dual Gene Therapy Suppresses Lung Cancer in Preclinical Test at  (January 11, 2007).
  3. New Method of Gene Therapy Alters Immune Cells for Treatment of Advanced Melanoma at http://www.cancer.gov (August 30, 2006).
  4. DNA Nanoballs Boost Gene Therapy at NewScientist.com
  5. Murine Gene Therapy Corrects Symptoms of Sickle Cell Disease from March 18, 2002, issue of The Scientist.
  6. See Undercover Genes Slip into the Brain at (March 20, 2006).
  7. See Gene Therapy Appears to Cure Myeloid Blood Diseases In Groundbreaking International Study at http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org (March 31, 2006).
  8. See Gene Therapy is First Deafness ‘Cure’ at  (February 11, 2005).
  9. See Gene Therapy May Switch off Huntington’s

 

A presentation on Dengue


Dengue http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=50379149&access_key=key-297yt44gdgh46kotyppt&page=1&viewMode=list

WELLNESS- BUILDING UP IMMUNITY_BY DR MAYANK MAWAR


WELLNESS- BUILDING UP IMMUNITY

DR. MAYANK MAWAR: mayank_mawar@yahoo.co.in

B.H.M.S., M.D.-Hom[Paeds.]

General Secretary, IIHP, DSB

 

The benefits of having a healthy immune system are absolutely essential to wellbeing. Without proper immune function, we quickly become the victims of disease – shortening our lives and impacting our capacity for happiness.

RISK FACTORS & WELLNESS TIPS
Get enough sleep
?Getting enough sleep is essential for a healthy immune system. When we sleep, the immune system is reinforced and replenished. Even one night’s sleep loss can significantly suppress the immune system.
Wash your hands
?Many micro-organisms are passed via skin contact with infected individuals or objects. Washing your hands before touching your face (rubbing your eyes, contacting your mouth or ears) can greatly reduce your exposure to harmful microbes in the environment; this lessens your chance of getting sick and of stressing your internal immune system.
Eat nutritious foods
?”You are what you eat.” Making sure your body receives only wholesome, nutritious foods is essential for optimum immune function. Immune-boosting foods include organically grown fruits and vegetables, wholegrain, beans and other legumes, natural oils such as expeller-pressed olive oil, hemp oil, walnut oil, flax oil and coconut butter.
* Brazil nuts, a rich source of selenium, are particularly good for the immune system. Selenium enhances immunity by activating glutathione peroxidase, an enzyme that inhibits the formation of free radicals and suppresses tumor growth.
* Fresh Kiwis, red peppers and to a lesser extent oranges, are rich sources of vitamin C, which is required by the immune system. Vitamin C is required by immune cells to enable optimal functioning. Interestingly enough, most animals produce their own vitamin C, whereas humans do not. It has been observed by many researchers that animals produce higher levels of vitamin C when they are immune-provoked or stressed; Nobel Prize laureate Dr. Linus Pauling believed this to be a protective defensive mechanism.
Avoid “unhealthy” foods
?Sugar and overly processed foods are foes of the healthy immune system. Sugar (including honey) suppresses many immune cells, particularly macrophages and NK cells. Other unhealthy foods include those containing hydrogenated oils (trans-fats), fried items, processed meats, baked goods made with white flour and foods that contain moulds.
Stay as stress-free as possible
?Although it’s easier said than done, keeping stress under control is essential for a healthy immune system. When we are stressed, our adrenal glands secrete a hormone known as cortisol. Although cortisol is in many ways good for our bodies (it helps keep inflammation in check, for example), too much of it on an ongoing basis can create havoc. For example, when cortisol output is high, the immune system secretes interleukin 6 (IL-6), which contributes to inflammation. IL-6 is also believed to cause autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia to worsen, to cause calcium to leave the bones, and to act as a growth factor for a number of tumors.
Get enough exercise
?Exercise is a wonderful immune booster and good for virtually every part of you! A program of regular, moderate exercise relieves stress and makes it easier for you to sleep at night.
Avoid alcohol and cigarettes
?Alcohol intake interferes with a variety of immune defenses. Research indicates that alcohol consumption is linked with certain types of cancers and infections. Cigarette smoke (inhaled or second hand) is saturated with toxic chemicals, most of which negatively impact immune response.
Avoid excessive sun exposure
?Unprotected sun exposure for longer than 15 minutes is linked with immune suppression. (This is why cold sores often appear following time spent in the sun.) Always wear a sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher. Be sensible though…a few minutes in the sun before 11:00 a.m. or after 4:00 p.m. will help your body produce vitamin D and not expose you to the risk of burns or immune problems.
Avoid exposure to pollutants and toxic chemicals
?Pollution is a major factor in immune suppression. Unfortunately, toxic chemicals are everywhere around us. Become informed! Learn to recognize harmful chemicals in the home and outside. Buy (or make) non-toxic cleaning fluids/sprays, and use natural cosmetics whenever possible.
Take Immune Fx
?Many mushrooms are recognized for their immune-enhancing properties. Medicinal mushrooms are a rich source of complex carbohydrates known as beta-glucans. One of the key functions of beta-glucans and other polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) found in medicinal mushrooms is to stimulate the production of immune components that guard the body against foreign invaders and protect us from our own aberrant cells (cancer). Countless studies over the last 40 years have confirmed the ability of these polysaccharides to stimulate a variety of immune system components.

GENERAL WELLNESS TIPS
Staying as well as you can now will help you to take advantage of future advancements in medicine and anti-aging science. Here are some general wellness suggestions that everyone can benefit from in their quest for a healthier, longer life:

EXERCISE

When it comes to staying youthful and healthy, nothing is of more value than exercise. A well thought-out exercise program can:

  • Help slow the aging process
  • Improve flexibility
  • Firm sagging muscles
  • Guard against osteoporosis
  • Help you lose weight or maintain your ideal weight
  • Reduce the risk of injury from a fall
  • Lower your risk of diabetes
  • Alleviate stress
  • Ease arthritis
  • Stop depression
  • Make you feel that you have achieved something

Three kinds of exercise contribute to a well-rounded exercise program that fully benefits your body. These are aerobic activity, strength training and flexibility exercises. You don’t have to run a marathon every week to keep fit; most fitness experts agree that moderate, regular exercise is enough to keep your body in shape and your mind invigorated. Recent studies have indicated that the good effects of smaller amounts of activity/exercise undertaken throughout the day are cumulative.
Physical activity not only improves muscle tone and flexibility it also:

  • increases blood circulation, improving the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the cells
  • enhances the drainage of lymphatic tissue waste, thereby helping to remove toxins from the system, and
  • helps the digestive system to process food better, reducing bloating and constipation.
EATING WISELY
While eating is for most, an enjoyable activity, the constant intake of the wrong foods can quickly add up to a health problem. Generally speaking, you should avoid foods that are overly fatty (particularly hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils and fats of animal origin such as fatty meat cuts), those that are overly processed, (canned foods such as soups, pasta, gravies, sauces, etc.), and those that are overly sweetened. Artificial sweeteners are also a no-no for the truly health-conscious.

Here are some pointers on how to improve your dietary intake for maximum health:

  • Stay hydrated. Drink at least eight glasses of pure bottled or filtered water daily. Water keeps the body hydrated, which is essential for all organs and systems. (Excess consumption of strong diuretics such as drugs, coffee and certain black teas can increase your need for water.)
  • Avoid bad fats. Avoid hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils (trans fatty acids) commonly added to refined foods as they have well-documented negative impacts on health.
  • Avoid sugar. Limit your intake of refined sugars including pasteurized honey. Refined sugars can lead to abnormal fluctuations in blood sugar resulting in mood swings, lowered immunity and lowered energy levels (fatigue). Try natural sugar (sucrose) alternatives such as stevia plant or licorice root extract.
  • Eat healthy fats. Increase your consumption of foods that contain the essential omega-3 fatty acids required by cell membranes to maintain structure and function. These omega-3 fats are particularly beneficial for the cardiovascular system and to help the body minimize inflammatory processes. Foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts and hemp seeds – so try adding these seeds to your meal plans.
  • Add whole foods. Consume mainly “natural” foods. Fresh organically grown fruits and vegetables are loaded with phytochemicals (plant nutrients) and fiber, which help to fight free radical action (anti-aging action) and keep the digestive system “regular.”
  • Eat berries. Increase your dietary intake of organic berries (blackberries, saskatoon berries, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, cranberries, etc) as they are loaded with antioxidants that protect against aging and disease.
  • Improve digestion. Eat more slowly and chew your food extra well to improve digestion. As the body ages, it produces a reduced amount of enzymes and stomach acid. This hampers the body’s ability to absorb vital nutrients.
  • Add a multi. It is often difficult to maintain adequate nutrient intake in this fast paced world full of processed food; therefore, it may be wise to add a high-quality vitamin-mineral supplement to your wellness program.
  • Evaluate your digestion. If you suspect that you may have a digestive problem ask your healthcare professional about the CDSA test, a laboratory diagnostic tool used to determine overall digestive system health.
  • Perhaps the best and simplest advice is “Eat to live, do not live to eat” and “Less is more” – to be more precise “Less attachments = More Well-being”

     

KEEP YOUR HOME HEALTHY

Most people are aware of the impact of outdoor pollution. Smog, vehicle exhaust and pesticides are recognized as major health threats. But how many people recognize the many dangers inside their own homes? Sadly, very few. Yet our houses are full of irritants that can be absorbed through the lungs, skin, eyes and digestive tract.

Improved building standards have made newer houses almost airtight, increasing the amount of allergens, chemicals and pollutants in indoor air. This is particularly problematic in winter when windows are more likely to remain closed. The increased pollution of indoor air has been cited by many health specialists to be the most likely cause of a recent increase in respiratory diseases and conditions such as allergies and asthma. Other indoor pollutants include chemicals in new carpeting, harsh detergents and even grooming products and cosmetics. You can help reduce risk to yourself and your family by:

  • using as few chemicals as possible around the house. (Hair sprays, room sprays and other aerosols, oven cleaners, carpet stain removers and many furniture polishes frequently contain harsh chemicals.)
  • stay away from pesticides as they have proven severe negative impacts on health.
  • investing in an air purifier to help trap airborne pollutants and allergens.
  • watching what you put on your skin. Soaps, shampoos (particularly those that contain sodium lauryl sulfate) and many body lotions contain irritating and allergenic substances. If you don’t believe that your skin absorbs substances applied to it, try rubbing a garlic clove on the sole of your foot. Within a minute or so, you will taste garlic.
  • keeping bathrooms and other “damp” areas well ventilated. This will discourage the growth of harmful moulds. Clean bathroom walls and wash bathroom mats often.

RESPECT THE SUN

In recent years, much has been written about the dangers of sunshine. True, the sun can cause skin cancers and premature aging of the skin – particularly in fair-skinned people – but it also helps keep us healthy and happy. Vitamin D is created when the sun shines upon our skin, and vitamin D is essential to life. Some doctors have speculated that the recent increase in colon cancer incidence is due to the overuse of sunscreens. (By preventing the creation of vitamin D, which is essential for colon health, sunscreens may cause the colon to become weakened and more susceptible to disease.)

Sunshine also helps to elevate the mood. SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) is a type of depression affecting those who live in areas where sunlight is restricted. If you are feeling low, go for a walk in the sunshine!

Develop positive attitude!

Weekly updates for audesapere.in


Good evening Doctors

 

Here are the weekly updates for audesapere.in

New Remedies added in database:-

 

Articles by: Dr Mayank Mawar:

1.   Tub child: http://audesapere.in/materiamedica/tubchild.html

2.  PICA: http://audesapere.in/hpd/pica_by_drmayank.html

 

New features added at website:-

Audesapere.in Blogs are now mobile compatible: Just point your browser toaudesapere.in/blogs

Tabbed system in Materia medica Section to browse article easily: http://audesapere.in/materiamedica/

Birthday calendar of Stalwart’s of Homeopathy: http://audesapere.in/homeopathy.html

Calender of events: http://audesapere.in/events.html

Age of homeopathy: http://audesapere.in/homeopathy.html

 

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