Posts Tagged ‘homeopathy’

Database of Scientific Publications in Homeopathy


DSPH IPRH

Browse online at http://audesapere.in/database

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Draft Template for Writing Homeopathic Clinical Trial Protocols – Version-I


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Trend of Nosodes Usage in Homeopathic Practice


As homeopathic physicians we use nosodes in our daily practice. Nosodes have become an indispensable part of various cure, palliations and relief. But approach regarding their usage varies and depends upon the philosophy with which they are taught. Keeping this thing in mind a survey has been undertaken on “Trend of Nosodes Usage in Homeopathic Practice” to explore the trends of Nosode usage in clinical practice . The survey is completely online and only takes a minute or two. It can be filled in any internet browser and even using your mobiles.

It is a sincere request you to kindly spare your precious time and fill it online at http://audesapere.in/polls-surveys/

Kindly consider sharing this survey with your friends and colleagues, and help me in this exciting venture. Identity of responders will be kept strictly confidential.

Best Regards
Dr. Saurav Arora
BHMS (Delhi), Gold Medalist
Homeopathic Physician and Consultant
Senior Research Fellow, CCRH
Formerly at SHMC/INMAS
Founder: IPRH (www.audesapere.in)
Editor-in-Chief: Journal of Case Studies in Homeopathy (www.jcshom.com)

Comparative Efficacy of Two Microdoses of a Potentized Homeopathic Drug, Arsenicum Album, to Ameliorate Toxicity Induced by Repeated Sublethal Injections of Arsenic Trioxide in Mice


Pathikrit Banerjee, Soumya Sundar Bhattacharyya, Surajit Pathak, Boujedaini Naoual, Philippe Belon, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh Key Words Arsenic toxicity, Mice, Biomarkers, Homeopathy, Matrix metalloproteinase Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of 2 potentized homeopathic remedies of Arsenicum Album (Ars Alb) – 6C and 30C – in combating chronic arsenic toxicity induced by repeated sublethal injections in mice (Mus musculus) . Methods: Mice were randomized and divided into sets: (1) normal (control 1); (2) normal + succussed alcohol (control 2); (3) As 2 O 3 (0.016%) injected at 1 ml/100 g body weight every 7 days (treated); (4) As 2 O 3 injected + succussed alcohol (positive control); (5) As 2 O 3 injected + Ars Alb 6C (drug-fed); (6) As 2 O 3 injected + Ars Alb 30C (drug-fed). Cytogenetical endpoints like chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, mitotic index, sperm head abnormality and biochemical protocols like acid and alkaline phosphatases, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and succinate dehydrogenase were studied at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Results: Compared to controls, chromosome aberrations, micronuclei, sperm head abnormality frequencies and activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases and lipid peroxi-dation were reduced in both drug-fed series, while mitotic index and activities of glutathione, catalase and succinate dehydrogenase were increased. Ars Alb 30C showed marginally better efficacy than Ars Alb 6C.Conclusion: Both remedies indicated potentials of use against arsenic intoxication.

The problem of dose in homeopathy: evaluation of the effect of high dilutions of Arsenicum album 30cH on rats intoxicated with arsenic


The problem of dose in homeopathy: evaluation of the effect of high dilutions of Arsenicum album 30cH on rats intoxicated with arsenic

Olney Leite Fontes1, Fátima Cristiane Lopes Goularte Farhat2, Amarilys Toledo Cesar1, Marilisa Guimarães Lara3,
Maria Imaculada Lima Montebelo1, Gabriela Cristina Gomes Rodrigues1, Marco Vinícius Chaud1.
(1) Methodist University of Piracicaba, (2) Medical School of Jundiaí
(3) Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto – USP

ABSTRACT

Background: Although scientific studies have confirmed the action of homeopathic high dilutions in living organisms an endless debate on the choice of the most fitting dilution, the frequency of administration and the dose (amount of medicine) still remains. Aims: This study sought to assess the in vivo effect of 2 different concentrations of Arsenicum album 30cH in order to elucidate some problems in the homeopathic notion of dose. Methods: Male Wistar rats previously intoxicated with sodium arsenate by peritoneal injection were treated with undiluted Ars 30cH and Ars 30cH in 1% solution administered by oral route. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the levels of arsenic retained in the animals as well as the amounts eliminated through urine. Urine samples were collected before and after and during treatment. A positive control group (intoxicated animals) and negative control group (non-intoxicated animals) were administered only the vehicle used to prepare the medicine (ethanol). Results: The groups treated with undiluted Ars 30cH and Ars 30cH in 1% solution eliminated significant amounts of arsenic through urine when compared to the control groups. The group treated with undiluted Ars 30cH eliminated significantly higher amounts of arsenic than the group treated with the same medicine in 1% solution. Conclusion: These results suggest that undiluted Ars 30cH was more effective than in 1% solution in this experimental model.

Keywords: Homeopathic medicines; Dose; Experimental model; Rats; Arsenic intoxication; Arsenicum album

 

Homeopathy Works Even on Nano grounds!!


IIT-B team shows how homeopathy works
Malathy Iyer | TNN

Mumbai: Six months after the British Medical Association rubbished homeopathy as witchcraft with no scientific basis, IIT scientists have said the sweet white pills work on the principle of nanotechnology.
Homeopathic pills containing naturally occurring metals such as gold, copper and iron retain their potency even when diluted to a nanometre or one-billionth of a metre, states the IIT-Bombay research published in the latest issue of ‘Homeopathy’, a peer-reviewed journal from reputed medical publishing firm Elsevier.
IIT-B’s chemical engineering department bought homeopathic pills from neighbourhood shops, prepared highly diluted solutions and checked these under powerful electron microscopes to find nanoparticles of the original metal.
‘‘Certain highly diluted homeopathic remedies made from metals still contain measurable amounts of the starting material, even at extreme dilutions of 1 part in 10 raised to 400 parts (200C),’’ said Dr Jayesh Bellare from the scientific team. ‘Homeo pills get potent on dilution’
His student, Prashant Chikramane, presented the homeopathy paper titled, ‘Extreme homeopathic dilutions retain starting materials: A nanoparticulate perspective’, as part of his doctoral thesis.
‘‘Homeopathy has been a conundrum for modern medicine. Its practitioners maintained that homeopathic pills got more potent on dilution, but they could never explain the mechanism scientifically enough for the modern scientists,’’ said Bellare.

A LITTLE MATERIAL ON BELLIS PERENNIS (DAISY)


Oxeye Daisy

Image by Dave ® via Flickr

BELLIS PERENNIS (DAISY)

Synonyms: Apigenin glycosides, Arnica montana, Asteraceae (family), asterogenic acid glycosides, bairnwort, bayogenin, Bellidis flos, Bellis sylvestris, bellissaponin, Bellorita, besysaponin, bisdesmosidic glycosides, bruisewort, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., common daisy, Compositae (family), consolida, daisy, day’s eye, dog daisy, English daisy, European daisy, flavonoids, flavonol glycosides, Gänseblümchen (German), glycosides, hen and chickens, Herb Margaret, La Paquerette (French), lawn daisy, little daisy, Madeliefje (Netherlands), Marguerite, Maslieben (German), Maya, meadow daisy, monodesmosidic glycosides, oxeye daisy, polyacetylenes, polygalacic acid, red daisy, saponins, Sedmikráska chudobka (Czech), triterpenoid glycosides, triterpenoid saponins, virgaureasaponin, wild daisy.

Note: Daisy is also the common name for oxeye daisy, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., another weedy species found in fields and along roadsides throughout the United States. This species is native to Europe and Asia, and has also been naturalized as a weed in North America.

Background: Bellis perennis is a common European species of daisy. Although many other related plants are also called daisy, Bellis perennis is often considered the archetypal species. It is sometimes called common daisy or English daisy. It is native to western, central, and northern Europe, but is commonly found as an invasive plant in North America.

The medicinal properties of Bellis perennis have been recorded in herbals as far back as the 16th century. John Gerard, the 16th century herbalist, recommended English daisy as a catarrh (inflammation of mucous membrane) cure, as a remedy for heavy menstruation, migraine, and to promote healing of bruises and swellings.

Infusions of the flowers and leaves have been used to treat a wide range of other disorders including rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and liver and kidney disorders. An insect repellent spray has also been made from an infusion of the leaves. A strong decoction of the roots has been recommended for the long-term treatment of both scurvy and eczema, and a mild decoction may ease complaints of the respiratory tract.

Bellis perennis has also been used traditionally for treating wounds. Chewing the fresh leaves is said to be a cure for mouth ulcers. In Homoeopathy, Bellis perennis is often used in combination with Arnica montana to treat bruising and trauma.

Common daisy is widely used in Homoeopathy, but is currently only rarely used in herbal medicine. Although homeopathic dosing is generally recognized as safe (GRAS; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designation), there is a lack of available scientific evidence to support claims for effectiveness related to the use of Bellis perennis. More research is needed in this area. Recent research has explored the possibility of using the plant in HIV therapy.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Bleeding (postpartum, mild): Homeopathic Bellis perennis has been used for bruising, bleeding, and recovery from surgery. Additional study of Bellis perennis alone is needed to make a firm recommendation.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Analgesic (pain reliever), antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, antitussive (suppresses coughs), arthritis, astringent, blood purifier, breast cancer, bronchitis, bruises, burns, bursitis (inflammation of bursa), childbirth (cesarean sections, episiotomy), cancer, catarrh (inflammation of mucous membrane), circadian clock acceleration, concussions, demulcent (soothes inflammation), digestion enhancement, diuretic, dysmenorrheal (painful menstruation), eczema, edema (post-operative and post-traumatic), emollient (soothes skin), expectorant (expels phlegm), fractures, HIV support, inflammation (tenosynovitis, styloiditis), insect repellent, jet lag, joint disorders (blood in joint), joint inflammation (epicondyle), joint problems (dislocations), kidney disorders, laxative, liver disorders, menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding), migraines, mouth ulcers, ophthalmologic (eye) uses, osteoarthritis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, periodontitis / gingivitis, pneumonia, post-surgical recovery (plastic surgery), purgative, rheumatism, scurvy, skin diseases, soft-tissue injury (acute), sports injuries, sprains, tissue healing after surgery (abdominal), tonic, trauma (pelvic organ), wounds.

Dosing: Adults (18 years and older)

Based on available scientific evidence, there is no proven safe or effective dose for Bellis perennis. One cup of tea made from 2 teaspoons of dried Bellis perennis herb steeped in 300 milliliters of boiling water for 20 minutes, and then strained, has been taken two to four times daily.

Typical homeopathic doses used are 1 or 2 (6C or 30C potency) tablets dissolved on the tongue. For general acute conditions, one dose every two hours repeated for a maximum of six doses has been used. For less acute conditions (e.g. seasonal or chronic), one dose three times a day between meals for no more than one month has been used.

Children (younger than 18 years): Based on available scientific evidence, there is no proven safe or effective dose for Bellis perennis. In general, 1 or 2 homeopathic 6C or 30C potency tablets dissolved on the tongue have been used. For general acute conditions, one dose every two hours for up to six doses has been used. For less acute conditions (e.g. seasonal or chronic), one dose three times a day between meals for no more than one month has been used.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies: Avoid in individuals sensitive or allergic to Bellis perennis products or any of their ingredients. Respiratory allergies have occurred in sensitive individuals.

Side Effects and Warnings: In general, Bellis perennis appears to be well tolerated when used at homeopathic doses.

As an herb, however, Bellis perennis may affect the clotting cascade, resulting in blood clotting. Common daisy may also result in stunted growth, although there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting this.

Patients at risk for coagulation disorders such as strokes or blood clots, or patients with anemia should use cautiously.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: Bellis perennis is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Avoid use at traditional herbal doses during pregnancy and breastfeeding because of the possibility of growth retardation in the fetus and infant.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs:Bellis perennis may affect coagulation and it is unclear how this herb may interact with medications that may increase the risk of bleeding. Examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (“blood thinners”) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®). Caution is advised.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements: Bellis perennis may affect coagulation, and it is unclear how this herb may interact with herbs and supplements that may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised when taking with herbs and supplements that may increase the risk of bleeding, such as garlic or Ginkgo biloba.

Attribution

This patient information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): J. Kathryn Bryan, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Jessica Clubb, PharmD (Northeastern University); Molly Davis, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Antoinette Edmondson, PharmD (Massachusetts College of Pharmacy); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Petra Jancar, PharmD (University of Ljubljana); Toni M. Schaeffer, PhD, PharmD (Albany College of Pharmacy); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

Read more: http://www.healthline.com/natstandardcontent/bellis-perennis/3#ixzz16vbp7xOE

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